DASH-SVC @ EUSIPCO 2012

Title: Using Scalable Video Coding for Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP in Mobile Environments

Authors: Christopher Müller, Daniele Renzi, Stefan Lederer, Stefano Battista, and Christian Timmerer

Abstract: Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) is a convenient approach to transfer videos in an adaptive and dynamic way to the user. As a consequence, this system provides high bandwidth flexibility and is especially suitable for mobile use cases where the bandwidth variations are tremendous. In this paper we have integrated the Scalable Video Coding (SVC) extensions of the Advanced Video Coding (AVC) standard into the recently ratified MPEG-DASH standard. Furthermore, we have evaluated our solution under restricted conditions using bandwidth traces from mobile environments and compared it with an improved version of our MPEG-DASH implementation using AVC as well as major industry solutions.

Conference: EUSIPCO2012, Bucharest, Romania, August 27-31, 2012


Impressions:

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4 Responses to DASH-SVC @ EUSIPCO 2012

  1. SnoiD says:

    Interesting but the comparison slide (11) there would be question.

    In particular, the client felt that what is most interesting:
    A quasi-constant quality solution with Apple (only 7 switches)
    A variable-quality but “average” upper (DASH + SVC 107 switches = more than one per minute)

    How visually, it translates these switches, during the high peaks, the peaks down?

    What is the gain of visual quality between an average flow at 1162kbps and 2738kbps one?

  2. Christopher Mueller says:

    “What is the gain of visual quality between an average flow at 1162kbps and 2738kbps one?”
    The bitrate is the representation/video bitrate. We haven’t included the PSNR in our former experiments due to the fact that all solutions use the same source content (big buck bunny), which has been encoded with x264. This means that the bitrate could be directly translated into PSNR.

    “How visually, it translates these switches, during the high peaks, the peaks down?”
    It decreases or increases the quality due to the available bitrate.

  3. SnoiD says:

    Thx for your answer Christopher.

    Have you made some test with “lambda/typical” customers ? If yes what are their reactions.

    I think it’s interesting technically to use all the bandwith available but I’m not sure it’s a really good experience to have a “so variable” quality. Because in the end if I pay for this stream I don’t really know for what quality I pay.

  4. Christopher Mueller says:

    “Have you made some test with “lambda/typical” customers ? If yes what are their reactions.”
    We haven’t made any subjective evaluations but [1] has made some.

    “but I’m not sure it’s a really good experience to have a “so variable” quality. Because in the end if I pay for this stream I don’t really know for what quality I pay.”
    It is much more annoying for the user when multiple rebuffering events occur.

    [1] P. Ni, R. Eg, A. Eichhorn, C. Griwodz, P. Halvorsen, “Spatial
    Flicker Effect in Video Scaling,” In Proc. of 3rd Int’l
    Workshop on Quality of Multimedia Experience, Mechelen,
    Belgium, Sep. 2011, pp. 55-60.

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